Antlers – Autumn Illumination

Antlers - High Level, Alberta 1
Antlers – High Level, Alberta 1
Antlers - High Level, Alberta 2
Antlers – High Level, Alberta 2
Antlers - High Level, Alberta 3
Antlers – High Level, Alberta 3

Sunday, morning sun illuminates an autumn backdrop for antlers of moose and deer, trophies located on the roof of the neighbor’s shed next door, a collection of shape, colour and texture.

Listening to – The Candid Frame and an interview with Dan Steinhardt, an Epson printer marketer as amateur photographer; key ideas ‘in-between meeting shots’ and Malcolm Gladwell’s conception of 10,000 hours working one toward becoming an expert in something. Jay Maisel’s assertion of doing the one-eighty because that is where you might find the better shot – the idea is look around from your vantage point for what else is going on.

Quote to Inspire – “I love the people I photograph. I mean, they’re my friends. I’ve never met most of them or I don’t know them at all, yet through my images I live with them.” – Bruce Gilden

Walking Within

Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 1
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 1
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 2
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 2
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 3
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 3
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 4
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 4
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 5
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 5
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 6
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 6
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 7
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 7
Kananaskis Country - Kananaskis, Alberta 8
Kananaskis Country – Kananaskis, Alberta 8

Gardner Hamilton was interviewed by Edmonton photographers Carey Nash and Kelly Redinger, who have created the ‘Lonely Photographers’ podcast. While talking essentially about street photography, Gardner provided distillation about what photography is and about the key attribute making one a photographer – a [photographer] is someone who does not necessarily go out with a mission, but someone who is [or becomes] mentally aware of when they have walked into a photograph. Gardner goes on to articulate the process of framing the shot, composition, about the need to be stealthy, about timing and moment – all skills needed for taking and making the shot. You make yourself vulnerable to a shot. You stop yourself and with your camera move into the shot and work the shot. The photograph becomes a gift of ‘seeing something’ for the first time.

In a drive to Kananaskis two weeks ago, there were many points of ‘recognizing a shot,’ those shots that could be taken, those points of becoming mentally aware of photographs that were available – frost covered, harvested farm fields at sunrise south from Peace River as shadows stretched across land, something not usually accessed by me in my usual travel times; bright yellows of hay bales and patterned swaths on farm fields west of Calgary; cattle ranches along rolling foothills in autumn colour moving into the Rocky mountains; shadows cutting into forested Kananaskis mountains along snowy ski trails high above in the last hour before sunset. These images were available in that drive – the choice really became about whether or not to pursue photography along the way versus waiting for the photography that could occur at destination. The images that follow are Kananaskis images, photography at destination – the three final ones are shot at night during full moon.

Listening to – ‘Crash’ and ‘Way Behind Me’ by the Primitives; then it’s on to the Kingsmen’s ‘Louie Louie’ and Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Pink Cadillac’ and ‘Radio Nowhere.’

Quote to Inspire – “The Pictures are there, and you just take them” – Robert Capa