Dyrhólaey Arch – Lighthouse

Beginning Southward - Iceland 1
Beginning Southward – Iceland 1
Beginning Southward - Iceland 2
Beginning Southward – Iceland 2
Beginning Southward - Iceland 3
Beginning Southward – Iceland 3
Beginning Southward - Iceland 4
Beginning Southward – Iceland 4
Cloudwork, Þjóðvegur, Southern Region - Iceland 1
Cloudwork, Þjóðvegur, Southern Region – Iceland 1
Cloudwork, Þjóðvegur, Southern Region - Iceland 2
Cloudwork, Þjóðvegur, Southern Region – Iceland 2
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 1
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 1
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 2
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 2
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 3
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 3
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 4
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 4
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 5
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 5
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 6
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 6
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 7
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 7
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 8
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 8
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 9
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 9
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 10
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 10
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 11
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 11
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 12
Lighthouse at Dyrhólaey Arch, Iceland 12

I was in Iceland a year ago. The time was opportunity to move within and over unexplored terrain, alone. I would respond to it all, feasting my eyes through my camera lens, always working to understand the visual narrative of the land, its weather and people.

The windward-leeward interaction of mountain weather is a visible dynamic in Iceland. Atlantic clouds push into mountains producing rainy, spitting drizzle along their path. On the lee side they roll down, over mountains becoming a moving cloud blanket that dissipates, evaporating in its encounter with sunlight. Iceland’s cloud-work is extraordinary in its shift and shape, its play of light and shadow, its depths and in its interaction with the island. It is mountain weather, weather that can change radically within the space of a few moments. What was seen is revealed, here, as high dynamic range HDR images.

The lighthouse grounds at the Dyrhólaey Arch serve as orienting point for most images. From this crag black, volcanic sand beaches are visible. The Atlantic Ocean shimmers and rolls in. Mist and rain shroud distant islands. And, rays of sunlight stream through cloud and reflect upon the ocean. Inland, mountain snow melts exposing rock, sand and dirt. Lighthouse access is found driving up the side of this mountain outcrop along a steep, muddy, one-track gravel road, a series of switchbacks without road barriers. Poor weather needs a careful driver’s eye to prevent an unfortunate tumble off this crag. With my smaller SUV (a 2006 Ford Escape), the climb and descent were exhilarating as was greeting opposing traffic.

Quote to Consider / Inspire: “I never tried to revolutionize photography; I just do what I do and keep my fingers crossed that people will like it.” – David Bailey

Listening to – two ‘On Being with Krista Tippett’ interviews/podcasts: ‘Carlo Rovelli – All Reality Is Interaction’ and ‘Pádraig Ó Tuama – Belonging Creates and Undoes Us Both;’ ‘The Candid Frame podcast with Ursula Tocik;’ and, Ólafur Arnalds, Atli Örvarsson & SinfoniaNord perform ‘Öldurót,’ a remembrance in music, recalling Iceland.

Murchie’s, Munro’s & Family

Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 1
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 1
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 2
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 2
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 3
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 3
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 4
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 4
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 5
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 5
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 6
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 6
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 7
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 7
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 8
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 8
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 9
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 9
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 10
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 10
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 11
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 11
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 12
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 12
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 13
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 13
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 14
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 14
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 15
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 15
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 16
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 16
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 17
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 17
Victoria, British Columbia - 24 September 2016, 18
Victoria, British Columbia – 24 September 2016, 18

Opportunity surfaced – we would have a Saturday in late September to ourselves on Vancouver Island. It would be two hours, our drive from Qualicum Beach to Victoria, and, it would mean two hours at the end of our day in return. But, it would allow us an afternoon among our favourite, family summer haunts.

Victoria’s Inner Harbour Causeway would open-out and hold our curiosity. We would walk and chat and tease. We engaged street theater performers and watched artists paint or draw. A person’s caricature would be created, a sculptor would carve in wood. We would people watch. My camera, following my eye, would move along harbour water finding boats and ships, old and new, moving and moored. Up from the causeway were Victoria streets and buildings. Green domes highlighted the British Columbia Legislature. The Fairmont Empress Hotel would command its view of the harbour – we had honeymooned here, within a room often provided to the Queen … all those years ago.

We walked from the harbour up Government Street. We would sift through ‘Out of Ireland’ imports – tartans and tweeds, quotes and blessings, jewels and people … almost a Cork jacket for me, there. We would cross back to Rogers’ Chocolates, each of us picking-out one or two, favourite Victoria Creams. Munro’s book store would hold us for hours. Literature, always current, from all parts of the globe would intrigue. You would find a book you thought someone would write at Munro’s. My wife would investigate current novels and favourite authors. As teacher, she would thumb through newest children’s books. As always we would empty this favourite book store, taking with us bags of books. With bags in tow we’d move next door, to Mom’s favourite coffee shop; we would sit down to tea and coffee, scones and macaroons at Murchie’s.

This day would become blessing, interruption within a difficult week – this outing would celebrate my wife’s birthday. And, we would remember Mom, Dad, brothers, grandparents, cousins, uncles, aunts, family friends and our times in Victoria.

Images – from that day in Victoria, 24 September 2016; also note that Justin and Sophie Trudeau welcomed Will and Kate on their Royal Visit to Canada (we’d happened upon this event) – hence images of the Canadian Forces, in their welcome of the Royal couple.

Quote to Consider / Inspire: “To the complaint, ‘There are no people in these photographs,’ I respond, there are always two people: the photographer and the viewer.” – Ansel Adams

Listening to – Ólafur Arnalds, Atli Örvarsson & SinfoniaNord’s ‘Öldurót’ from their ‘Island Songs’ album, Brian Finnegan’s ‘Belfast’ from his ‘The Ravishing Genius of Bones’ album, The Six Parts Seven’s ‘What You Love You Must Love Now,’ Mooncake’s ‘Turquoise,’ Simon Steadman and TT Magruber’s ‘Sunshower’ and ‘Miss You’ by Trentemøller. Martyn Joseph’s ‘Sanctuary’ and Hedzoleh Sounds’ ‘Hearts Ne Kotoko’ have also featured in this morning’s listening.

Between Terms – Hybrid Trail

MIrrored Building - Edmonton, Alberta 1
MIrrored Building – Edmonton, Alberta 1
alberta-legislature-edmonton-alberta-2
alberta-legislature-edmonton-alberta-2
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alberta-legislature-edmonton-alberta-4
architectural-festival-installation-edmonton-alberta
architectural-festival-installation-edmonton-alberta
cn-tower-edmonton-alberta
cn-tower-edmonton-alberta
edmonton-skyline-from-north-east
edmonton-skyline-from-north-east
edmonton-skyline-from-under-saskatchewan-drive
edmonton-skyline-from-under-saskatchewan-drive
edmonton-skyline-from-west
edmonton-skyline-from-west
gibson-building-edmonton-alberta
gibson-building-edmonton-alberta
grant-mcewan-university-entrance
grant-mcewan-university-entrance
hotel-cutaway-edmonton-alberta
hotel-cutaway-edmonton-alberta
mirrored-building-edmonton-alberta-1
mirrored-building-edmonton-alberta-1
mirrored-building-edmonton-alberta-2
mirrored-building-edmonton-alberta-2
mirrored-building-edmonton-alberta-3
mirrored-building-edmonton-alberta-3
walterdale-home-edmonton-alberta
walterdale-home-edmonton-alberta

We were in Edmonton and only days into our summer break when I seized the opportunity to cycle along Edmonton’s River Valley Bike trails. These trails were ones I road between terms at University thirty years ago. Then, I road a Kuwahara, chromoly steel-framed mountain bike. I bought it after my 1986 convocation and completion of my first degree. Now I road a new, Giant Hybrid Roam I. It replaced my weathered, well-ridden, fifteen-year-old, yellow Specialized HR (HardRock) Comp mountain bike. I donated it to Goodwill and bought the Giant Roam I.

The trail I remember had been a quick-paced, two-hour ride. The route covered upwards of forty kilometres. Now, I encountered the River Valley’s up and down on each side of the North Saskatchewan River. It passed by the Riverside Golf Course, through Rundle Park, out to the Strathcona Science Centre, then back along Ada Boulevard to Concordia College. From there, it moved past the Dawson Bridge, under the City Centre, past the Alberta Legislature, across the High Level Bridge, alongside the Pitch-and Putt behind the Kinsmen Field House, under Saskatchewan Drive toward the James MacDonald Bridge, then the Low Level Bridge and finally up a rigorous climb from under the St. Joseph Seminary out of the River Valley and then through Forest Heights Park to McNally High School where my truck waited.

Where I had completed this trek in two hours, thirty years ago, this well-worn path was taking me upwards of three and a half hours to complete. Sections of the once familiar route now suffered neglect – cracks and frost-heaves made the trail uneven. Hard-core, cycle-til-you-drop Edmonton cyclists had taken to spray painting cracks with bright paint to remind and to warn other cyclists of bumps along the trail. Other parts of the cycling trail were being restored. In one case a cycling bridge beneath the Shaw Centre was being dismantled and replaced. A detour was needed around this construction site – a ten minute, hard climb out of the valley with travel along the edge of the city centre core. Cycling time extended. Detours added delay.

Stopping to gather photographs slowed my cycling circuit. I was searching-out images associating to memories of early morning cycling in the Edmonton River Valley. Other images took-in and experimented with Edmonton architecture. Composition in some photographs now seems hasty. Cycling’s faster pace has seemed, at this later editing date, to have limited my awareness of all (or other) composition choices. Images that I photograph while walking hold different consideration. Walking into the scene gathers perception for what an image can become. Good consideration for how to frame a shot can occur. Three days of early summer cycling gathered these images.

Listening to – Keith Jarrett’s concert album, ‘The Köln Concert’ from 24 January 1975 – enjoying this as a former piano player.

Quote to Consider / Inspire: “Adequate photographers use their sight, good photographers use their senses, and great photographers use their souls.” – A. J. Compton

Summer Repose

Alberta Legislature Building - Edmonton, Alberta Canada 1
Alberta Legislature Building – Edmonton, Alberta Canada 1
Alberta Legislature Building - Edmonton, Alberta Canada 2
Alberta Legislature Building – Edmonton, Alberta Canada 2
Alberta Legislature Building - Edmonton, Alberta Canada 3
Alberta Legislature Building – Edmonton, Alberta Canada 3

Summer had begun. I left my truck at a Ford dealership for service and cycled eastward within Edmonton’s river valley. The morning featured billowing clouds against a bright blue sky. Rain and sun would feature throughout the day. I gathered in the world that met me with my camera. Here, the Alberta Legislature building sits in quiet summer morning repose.

Quote to Consider – “Photography is an art of observation. It has little to do with the things you see and everything to do with the way you see them.” – Elliot Erwitt

Listening to – Wardruna’s ‘Runaljod Raganarok’ album; if you are into the ‘Vikings’ mini-series, Wardruna provides the opening and closing soundscape, a song entitled ‘Völuspá.’ ‘Raido’ and ‘Odal’ are songs of interest.

Skyline Silhouette

Edmonton Skyline 1
Edmonton Skyline 1
Edmonton Skyline 2
Edmonton Skyline 2
Edmonton Skyline 3
Edmonton Skyline 3
Edmonton Skyline 4
Edmonton Skyline 4

A summer image, looks west from Baseline Road at 17th Street to Edmonton’s skyline; it appears as silhouette. To the left and right are various petroleum-based industries – the road is known also as ‘Refinery Row.’

Quote to Consider – “Just put on the lens and go.” – Miroslav Tichy

Listening to – Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Open All Night,’ as first rendered on his Nebraska album – a rockin’ boogie on an electric guitar and the voice of Bruce, those two instruments, nothing else; the song is quite different from piano and band boogie as it is rendered on his ‘Live in Dublin’ performance. Also, listening to ‘The Candid Frame: A Photography Podcast’ and Ibarionex Perello’s interview of Stacey Pearsall and the subject of Military Journalism and the Veterans’ Portrait Program.

Forty Sorties

AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 1
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 1
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 2
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 2
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 3
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 3
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 4
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 4
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 5
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 5
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AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 6
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 6a
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 6a
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 7
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 7
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 8
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 8
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 9
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 9
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 10
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 10
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 11
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 11
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 12
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 12
AVRO Lancaster - Nanton, Alberta 13
AVRO Lancaster – Nanton, Alberta 13

I heard a lot about the AVRO Lancaster and the RCAF around our kitchen table. As an adolescent during the seventies, I was making sense of the Second World War. I was grappling with facts coming to me. Twenty years before I was born, Canada fought a war in Europe. My good-natured uncle, who now farmed with his family, in central Alberta had been a bomber pilot. He had done so before marrying my aunt and starting a family. Our families exchanged visits through each year. They would come to our home for Christmas and Easter. We would see them every other month or so at their farm. We would spend the better part of an afternoon and evening together in each visit. Sometimes a comment or question about piloting a Lancaster would come and I would listen to narrative. I would try to work out what a Lancaster was and what the adults were referring to. My curiosity would stir and I’d wait for the drive home to confirm or ask about what I’d heard.

Those conversations evolved into dinner table fodder. Around the table I could ask questions and listen to answers. Extrapolation, implication – I gathered understanding of my pilot uncle and the Lancaster. What was it like to fly forty sorties in a flight stream to Berlin, Kiel and the Ruhr Valley in War? What kind of task was it to lay mines in enemy waters? My uncle and his crew would need to abandon three Lancaster Bombers in the war – none of the crew were lost, all parachuting to safety each time. My father would point me to an AVRO Lancaster book in the Coles bookstore. He and I would assemble a model of the Lancaster together at our kitchen table. I continue to piece this narrative together decades beyond those kitchen table discussions.

Much later on, my uncle re-certified as a pilot. He and a friend purchased and had a single engine, Cessna 172 that had crashed rebuilt. The plane became alternate transport within Alberta and later around North America. He and my aunt flew to Cuba for vacations. He enjoyed flight. His family gave him opportunities to fly them to different destinations. On one flight I got to ride-along. One fall evening, we dropped off my cousin one-hundred kilometres away. It was my first venture flying in a single engine plane. It took a minute-or-two to find my confidence in this mode of transport – it came, I could trust it. The flight only took twenty minutes.

After landing, taking off again and returning to the air, my uncle invited me to fly his Cessna. My hands took the control. My feet explored the workings of the rudder pedals. My uncle spoke about yaw, pitch and roll and how each worked. I was working to manage the attitude of the plane as we returned to his farm. He had me keep my eye on the horizon as the way to maintain level flight. As we flew, my uncle completed paperwork detailing the route we’d taken. I asked about flying the Lancaster. He said it handled like a heavy truck. With the release of its payload the Lancaster became more buoyant, with noticeable lift. Though lighter it did not pick up any agility. That may have been in my second year of University. Implications associated with the Lancaster’s role in the war were yet to surface.

This past winter I watched BBC One’s ‘Bomber Boys.’ The AVRO Lancaster and the men that flew them are the subject of this documentary. Ewan McGregor hosts the documentary. In it, Ewan’s brother Colin, a Royal Air Force pilot, trains to fly a functional AVRO Lancaster. The documentary spurred my curiosity, again. Over the years, I had heard about an AVRO Lancaster located near Calgary, Alberta.

Nanton, Alberta is home to ‘Bomber Command Museum.’ Its chief artifact is a functioning AVRO Lancaster. This past August, I had time between the completion of a conference and some tasks before my return northward home. I arrived in Nanton on 20 August 2016. I arrived as Nanton’s Bomber Command Museum was celebrating its 30th Anniversary. Their Lancaster was outside its hangar. That day I would see the Lanc Crew start all four Merlin engines and before the crowd the Lancaster would move forward 20 feet under its own power. I was able to get a sense for the bomber – its size, the length and depth of its bomb bay, its shape and sound. I also worked to understand the Lancaster through the lens of my camera. The images posted here are of the Lancaster at Nanton’s Bomber Command Museum.

My investigation of what would have been my uncle’s Lancaster and war experience continues. Len Deighton offers a dramatization of a final mission of an RAF Lancaster Bomber. It occurs in the skies and on the ground, in Britain and in Germany. I have it as audio-book on my iPod, listening to it as I cycle to and from our local airport.

I am still at a distance from my uncle’s story. I know that flight engaged my uncle. It brought him challenge and satisfaction. It suited his temperament. For me, the Lancaster is a means to understand that my uncle brought a hand to shaping the world we know. For me, his narrative with the Lancaster helps me understand service, one man’s for another, and that my uncle served our country and protected its freedom. A Flight Lieutenant in the RCAF 428 ‘Ghost Squadron,’ commissioned in 1941, his commendation reflects this well – “His willingness and the cheerful manner in which he has carried out his duties has been a source of inspiration for the younger crews of the squadron. For the completion of a most satisfactory tour of operations and for the support he has given the squadron, I recommend the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.” He received his DFC in 1949.

Well done, Sir. Thank you.

P.S.: My cousin and his wife were able to take my uncle to Nanton in his later years; he took great pride in showing them ‘his’ plane.

Quotes to Consider / Inspire: (1) “In my view you cannot claim to have seen something until you have photographed it.” – Emile Zola; and, (2) “The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.” – Henry David Thoreau.

Listening to: Len Deighton’s ‘Bomber.’

Morning Images

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 1

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 2

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 3

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 4

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 5

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 6

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 7

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 8

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 9

Morning Images - High Level, Alberta - Canada 10

Enjoying spring’s weather and colour in these morning images along 20 kilometres from High Level to our airport and back.

Quote to Consider/Inspire – “The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.” – Pablo Picasso

Listening to – Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Born in the U.S.A. (Live Acoustic Version)’ from The Bridge School Concerts – 25th Anniversary Edition,’ Peter Gabriel’s ‘Shaking the Tree’ and Jason Isbell’s ‘Speed Trap Town.’