Storehouse Timbers

Storehouse - St Louis Catholic Mission - Buttertown, Alberta 1
Storehouse – St Louis Catholic Mission – Buttertown, Alberta 1
Storehouse - St Louis Catholic Mission - Buttertown, Alberta 2
Storehouse – St Louis Catholic Mission – Buttertown, Alberta 2
Storehouse - St Louis Catholic Mission - Buttertown, Alberta 3
Storehouse – St Louis Catholic Mission – Buttertown, Alberta 3
Storehouse - St Louis Catholic Mission - Buttertown, Alberta 4
Storehouse – St Louis Catholic Mission – Buttertown, Alberta 4

A spring thaw in the early nineteen-hundreds saw several Fort Vermilion area farms flooded. In one instance a farm building washed out, the movement of the water weakening its foundation enough to topple the structure. Timber for that building floated downstream on the Boyer River becoming snagged at a turn in the river as it passed the St. Louis Catholic Mission in Buttertown. Those timbers were pulled from the river and after a time were used to build this storehouse for the mission. The photo was created in May, 2013. Last Saturday night, the image became editing focal point as I showed my son how Lightroom 5 and NiK Software can be used – four versions were produced, some following his eye’s lead.

Listening to – Coldplay’s ‘Yellow,’ a song I worked through after all had gone to bed last night; the piano work is more difficult than the fretwork; the resonance and dissonance found in the chords and alternate tuning are captivating.

Quote to Consider – “Photographs, which cannot themselves explain anything, are inexhaustible invitations to deduction, speculation, and fantasy.” – Susan Sontag, ‘On Photography’

6 thoughts on “Storehouse Timbers

    1. Hey there, Jim:

      Shingles, textures at the edge – taking image interest to the edge from focal point and plane of focus, releasing the shutter all the way to edits; I’m with you. I remember a moment when my daughter, experiencing growing pains at age 2 or 3 let my wife, my son and I know that her ‘edges’ (sides) hurt. Close distortion occurs with the Sigma 10-20 mm lens and adds to imperfect lines and sense of being within what is viewed.

      Cool.

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