From My Ford-Focused Canon 60D

Nose - 1938 Ford One Ton Tow Truck
Nose – 1938 Ford One Ton Tow Truck
Ford Grain Truck - Wabamun, Alberta
Ford Grain Truck – Wabamun, Alberta
67 Ford Econoline Van
67 Ford Econoline Van
64 Mercury Monterey 2
64 Mercury Monterey 2
64 Mercury Monterey 1
64 Mercury Monterey 1

Looking up from my Ford-focused Canon 60D the highway held a semi hauling a flat-deck trailer with a Diversified Bus on it, its roof crushed – a sight as curious as it is disturbing. Diversified runs buses in northeastern Alberta. A passenger bus like this, the kind Greyhound uses, is never something anyone wishes to see in this state – the image implies rollover and injury. Hopefully, the accident was less serious than can be imagined. But, on those long, northern Alberta drives Greyhound buses do slide sideways on ice, occasionally – accidents involving such buses do occur from time to time.

Each image presented, here, has been an editing exercise exploring editing sequences other photographers have utilized to arrive at final image renderings. Ford Motor Company (FOMOCO) provides subject for these images – the nose of the 1938 Ford One Ton Tow Truck, a late sixties Ford One Ton grain truck, a 64 Mercury Monterey and a 67 Ford Econoline van.

Listening to – Gwyneth Paltrow singing ‘Country Song’ and ‘Travis.’

Quote to Inspire – “Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson

3 Comments Add yours

  1. kiwiskan says:

    I don’t know about that quote – I don’t think I have enough time left! As usual, love the images.

    1. Hey there, … 🙂

      I don’t know … when I shoot a basketball game for my school, I’ve usually got between 600-1200 images; about a quarter of them are worthy of interest and from that group of images maybe 10 or so find their way into the school yearbook And, with 18 megapixels a shot, those images easily turn into 20-30 Gb of photo memory. Some of what goes on is that you’re trying to get a certain image and the reality is that some images fail in terms of what we were hoping for … so you look at what you have, you correct and try again – it’s about decision making along the way and in the moment. The big thing, though, is to have a camera with you – a full DSLR or a small point and shoot stuck in your pocket; either way, the job is to understand what you’re looking at, what interests you and to move toward better and better shots of those things that interest you. The other thing that’s necessary is the matter of being disciplined enough to stop for the photo … doing so, you get into the practice of seeing and discovering the shots.

      It’s also about where to invest our time. And, in my Life the past few years have been something demonstrating that there are only so many hours in a day.

      I thought the same thing a few years back; but, the reality is that in the past thirteen years I must have above 100000 shots. 😉

      1. kiwiskan says:

        Thank you for your comprehensive and thoughtful reply. You can meet some neat people on line 🙂

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s