Window Pragmatics

Homestead on a Hill - near Sexsmith, Alberta - Canada
Homestead on a Hill – near Sexsmith, Alberta – Canada

Ten minutes north from Sexsmith, Alberta this homestead is one previously photographed in mid-winter, the land smoothed under a snow blanket, the homestead roof likewise blanketed, but windswept with snow blown into curvilinear shape. Here, in early spring, the homestead’s greying outline pulls my eye, then it is its placement on the rise in this field, then the weather drama of its backdrop clouding and finally it’s the immensity of the homestead windows, each – one on each side – four feet tall by one and a half feet in breadth; much can be seen from this homestead. A South African farming friend points out that being able to see in each direction – north, east, south and west – requires that the farming home be placed at best vantage point to allow observation and consideration of happenings on the farm property. Pragmatics is what has been highlighted – all should be seen from the farm home and limit the need to be on the land to check on things.

Listening to – John O’Donohue’s ‘Longing and Belonging.’

Quote to Consider – “Of course, there will always be those who look only at technique, who ask ‘how,’ while others of a more curious nature will ask ‘why.’ Personally, I have always preferred inspiration to information.” – Man Ray

7 thoughts on “Window Pragmatics

    1. Hey there, Tim:

      You’re helping me understand the appeal of this image (I’ve been looking at it regularly) – an echoing of horizontals, the smooth and straight in the homestead’s lines echoed by the rough-hewn landscape horizons of the field and treeline and then the broad sweep horizontals in the clouds; the verticals in the homestead also echo in the verticals of the trees and to some degree the field stubble. There’s also something about proportion, here. Thanks for helping me see how this image works. 😉

  1. I always look forward to your images. You know how to capture the feeling of whatever you’re shooting. And, by the way, thanks for the likes you’ve been sending my way. I do appreciate them.

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