Fenced Barbed-wire – This Side

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 1

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 2

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 3

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 4

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 5

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 6

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 7

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 8

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 9

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 10

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 11

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 12

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 12a

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 13

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 14

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 15

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 16

Chevrolet Grain Truck - Edmonton, Alberta 17

In the week following school year-end and the beginning of summer school break, my wife, my daughter and I find ourselves in Edmonton. A Sunday afternoon becomes opportunity for me to look around Edmonton with fresh eyes, this city I knew as child and youth, this city I grew up in. In my travels, parts of the city receive spitting of rain from moisture-laden skies, stacking cumulus clouds pushed across Edmonton by substantial summer winds. Less windy and wet moments provide opportunity to use clouded skies as backdrop to architecture and landscape. I’m needing to fall into sync with the opportunity of/for photos and the cadence of parking and getting out of the vehicle for possible photos.

Alongside the Anthony Henday roadway near Callingwood Avenue in Edmonton’s west-end, in a farmer’s field, on the other side of fenced, barbed-wire an older truck is parked, a truck that is likely to be a 1949 Chevrolet half-tonne with grain box, a vehicle that if rehabilitated could become vintage and a classic. The intention, as I’ve watched through these ten years, had been to use the retro look of this vintage truck with the side panels of the grain box to advertise location of a knick-knacks store in this west-end community. That store no longer exists and no one has set about moving the truck or dismantling the grain box and advertising. Erosion – rain, sun, snow and wind – has brought the grain box down and rusting to the truck’s body and cab has added deep, rough, orange peel texture to this truck’s exterior … all becoming fodder for photos.

Listening to – Jack White’s version of a U2 tune, ‘Love is Blindness,’ and the Tijuana Brass – ‘Lonely Bull,’ ‘Spanish Flea,’ ‘Taste of Honey,’ and ‘Tijuana Taxi.’

Quote to Inspire – “We try to grab pieces of our lives as they speed past us. Photographs freeze those pieces and help us remember how we were. We don’t know these lost people but if you look around, you’ll find someone just like them.” – Gene McSweeney

2 Comments Add yours

  1. redjim99 says:

    The almost abstract feel you have in some of these pictures is great, the mirror, with badges is my top. I think the detail you bring out in the clouds is amazing, especially keeping the rest of the image bright. I like to isolate parts of an image afterwards, to bring out a specific detail.

    Jim

    1. Hey there, Jim:

      I’m liking those abstract images too. The mirror with badges is neat; I’m thinking it’s a little grainy and may have another go at it. The detail … I’m thinking that you may have purchased a new camera this summer (we talked about a Fuji earlier this year). One of the features that you may have is automatic exposure bracketing – the opportunity to take the same image with regular exposure, exposure one stop down and another one stop up from regular. What you can do is fuse the three images into a master image, creating a high dynamic range (HDR) image. I was able to do this on my old computer with photomatix (as plug-in to Adobe Lightroom) and with the free time within the last day was able to figure out how to manage it within Adobe Lightroom 5 on this newer computer. HDR allows for handling/creating an image that accommodates the range of light that the eye is capable of seeing. It also allows for handling many exposures (sometimes up to eleven or twelve) and fusing them together.

      Not all the images here are HDR. The first two or three are HDR and the ones tending towards the abstract begin with an HDR base.

      Like you, after I bring the image in I work to isolate and emphasize within the image; it’s as much discovery within the image as it is working with intention.

      Take care … 😉

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