Ethereal, Restless – Dreaming

House of Dreams 1
House of Dreams 1
House of Dreams 2
House of Dreams 2
House of Dreams 3
House of Dreams 3
House of Dreams 4
House of Dreams 4
House of Dreams 5
House of Dreams 5

This farmhouse image is one that I connect to moments we’ve all had – that ethereal, restless dream state when dreaming’s hallucination can draw forth what seems other-worldly connection. For me, I recall Mr. Lockwood who upon renting Thrushcross Grange ventured out on a winter walk to meet and greet his landlord, a man by the name of Heathcliff. The story, set in the late 1700s – early 1800s, sees the newly installed Mr. Lockwood walking to the property of his new landlord, a home with a name – Wuthering Heights. A snow storm brews up and makes it necessary for Mr. Lockwood to stay the night in his landlord’s home.

A place is made for him in what seems is a book cupboard or closet.

He reads a pen and ink commentary set forth in the margins of books within this sleeping closet; print books, the only source of paper available to another character, Catherine Earnshaw, are the place where Catherine journals about and considers her life – a journal that in tone and availability serves as confidante for the teen who as estate owner’s daughter is without ready access to peers her age at the Wuthering Heights farm estate. Mr. Lockwood can’t sleep – he reads and reads and reads about Catherine and Heathcliff … until in that ethereal, restless dream state he enters into dream hallucination, a state in which he encounters a young Catherine who within the snow storm outside knocks at ‘his’ window asking to be let in. The farmhouse in this image meets well many of the essential elements of what my mind imagines that Wuthering Heights could be. This house seems ready for all that Emily Bronte’s novel, Wuthering Heights, might hold. And, there’s more to that story ….

Listening to – Maria Dunn’s God Bless Us Everyone, Michael Hoppe’s Land of Serenity, Bill Douglas’ Irish Lullaby, Grant McAskill’s Bitter Season, Catherine Anne McFee’s I See Winter and Paul Brady’s Help Me Believe.

Quote to Inspire – “I want the viewers to be moved into the lives of the people that they are looking at, the visual experience is incredibly emotional.” Paul Fusco

6 Comments Add yours

  1. kiwiskan says:

    Brilliant photo. I love all these different moods

    1. Hey there … Hello:

      It’s the first photo that really has me thinking Bronte-wise … an house that could subjected to wuthering weather.

      I’m a day away from being able to investigate The Christmas Mystery … I’ll bet that Audrey’s Books in Edmonton may have it. Thanks for looking in.

      Take care, and enjoy your Christmas. 🙂

      1. kiwiskan says:

        Let me know if you can’t find it, and I’ll have a look for another copy

      2. Cool … thank you; I’ll let you know.

        Take care … 🙂

    1. Hello Nicole:

      Thank you for your kind words; I’ve enjoyed your photos too.

      Take care … 🙂

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