Photographic Recollection

Homestead in Late Fall - Fairview, Ab ii
Homestead in Late Fall – Fairview, Ab ii
Canadian Geese - Flying South, Fairview, Alberta - Canada
Canadian Geese – Flying South, Fairview, Alberta – Canada
Homestead in Late Fall - Fairview, Ab i
Homestead in Late Fall – Fairview, Ab i
Homestead in Fall - Fairview, Alberta - Canada 1
Homestead in Fall – Fairview, Alberta – Canada 1
Homestead in Fall - Fairview, Alberta - Canada 2
Homestead in Fall – Fairview, Alberta – Canada 2
Homestead in Fall - Fairview, Alberta - Canada 3
Homestead in Fall – Fairview, Alberta – Canada 3

An audio-book calmed us, my wife and I, during a night drive north on Alberta’s highway 63. Moving past our Grassland pit stop, we turned left traveling northward to Fort McMurray. As we drove, a snow storm brewed until we were within a wall of big, heavy snow flakes. I backed off on the gas and turned our high-beams to low. I minded the road, scouting the snow track left by previous vehicles. I gave oncoming vehicles a wide berth. I placed our vehicle with care on this highway with sharp shoulders.

I pushed the first audio-cassette in.

A familiar, Canadian voice met our ears – Donald Sutherland began narrating our story. “Did he know? Had he guessed that I knew for certain what everyone else only suspected?” … “I found myself looking straight into the past. Sunday, October 28, 1956. A cabin, not ten miles from where I stood now.” … “This is the weekend when we’re closing the cabin for the season and my mother has been moving around in the other room, cleaning, but now the screen door snaps shut as she steps outside. It is now that I see my father. He is hurrying away from the cabin ….” (Part 1 – May Brightman, Chapter 1 – ‘The Red Fox’ by Anthony Hyde, 1986). The cabin is starting point for a narrative that moves the reader compellingly around the world, a journalistic detective story that weaves historical fiction into curious and intriguing questions of ‘what-if.’

The homestead in the photographs posted here is one I have photographed many times. The edit arrived at in this image has brought forward mind’s eye recollection of the family summer cabin that Robert Thorn, protagonist (and journalist) recalls, as well, in an October funeral for his mother. Anthony Hyde’s novel led us as listeners through the untangling of truth from lies and the consideration of possibilities and where their trajectories of reasoning would lead you – definitely the right book to listen to on a long, snowy drive into Alberta’s north.

Listening to – Bruce Springsteen’s ‘If I Should Fall Behind.’

Quote to Inspire/Consider – “The eye should learn to listen before it looks.” – Robert Frank

6 thoughts on “Photographic Recollection

  1. You’ve shown how different the same subject can appear based on editing. Love the cabin. And the geese!! I’ve seen them flying over so many times … but I’m usually on the highway, with no place to pull over!

    1. Hey there, Laurie:

      This was an instance where I had time to pull over. And, the geese were many and perhaps seemed somewhat confused … they circled in gathering before moving on in two distinct V-shapes. I am enjoying new editing options from Topaz … if you get to try out the full suite there is one called Impression.

      Take care … hope all’s well on the election front. 😉

  2. Hi,
    I like the extra perspective, and by extension the wider story of the cabin in it’s space, of Canada 2. Number 3 is an uneasy cobweb of a picture, looks a bit menacing.

    My wife and I often listen to stories while driving, passing time and miles. We’re entering a quiet period at the moment, most of our work is done and Christmas hasn’t started, nice to have the gap.

    Take Care

    Jim

    1. Hey there, Jim:

      Just re-read the post and recognize omission; the story and the snow storm belong to a road no longer traveled. The recollection dates back to a 1988 snow storm and us as young marrieds returning north to my wife’s first teaching assignment.

      Take care … 😉

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