Wisconsin Locomotive – Part 2

I am including four other photographs of the Wisconsin locomotive engine within the High Level Canadian National rail yard.

My interest in locomotive engines probably began with the matter of watching them pass by at railroad crossings, as a youngster, sitting among family in our 1969, silver-green Pontiac Parisienne; the big thing was to wave to the engineer and pull our arms down as if we were tugging on a rope above us – to our gesture we were sometimes rewarded with the engineer blowing the train’s air horn in our presence,  something that would thrill us, creating big smiles on the faces of everyone. Later, during summers while in university, I served as spotter and brakeman moving hopper cars around rail yards in southern Edmonton. And, now, I still have an interest in trains and locomotives.  I wonder how much of my current interest has been shaped by time enjoyably shared with my son reading Thomas the Tank Engine stories each night or watching the animated VHS video stories or in building different wooden track configurations and moving different engines around my son’s Thomas the Tank Engine track – Thomas, Percy, Rusty et al. Here, in Reverend Wilbert Awdry’s stories, it’s the everyday advice on the practicalities of living and the allegorical component of his stories that continues to hold my attention … there’s value and values there. My son is now eighteen and in university – many good facets of what life is about have been embedded in his character through these stories; these stories have been an enjoyable investment in my son’s future. And, still trains and what they accomplish capture my interest.

Listening to Billy Bragg and Wilco perform Stetson Kennedy from the Mermaid Avenue, Vol. 2 album; then it’s been Black Rebel Motorcycle Club … who would have thought four seminary graduates would minister through music … like this in Ha Ha High Babe.

Quote to Inspire – “I began to realize that the camera sees the world differently than the human eye and that sometimes those differences can make a photograph more powerful than what you actually observed.” – Galen Rowell

5 Comments Add yours

  1. Angeline M says:

    These are some wonderful shots. I too love trains.

  2. Leanne Cole says:

    I like trains too, there is something old about them. I would like to go and photograph some old rail yards, but security everywhere has tightened so much. I love the trains with the snow.

    1. Hey there, Leanne:

      Thank you for looking in on the Wisconsin Locomotive; like you, I’d like to have a day in an old rail yard. The last one that was a formal venture was one in Galveston, Texas, one Easter. In this region, I am thinking of Hay River and Vale Island in the Northwest Territories – I’d like to have a day in the ship yard among the unused boats.

      Take care, …

  3. I grew up in a railroading family. Everyone worked on the railroad except me. I was a rebel. I sure enjoy riding them, though. Here in San Diego we have Amtrak, Metrolink, San Diego Trolley, Coaster, and Sprinter. I’m never at a loss for a train to ride.

    1. Hey there, Russell:

      It has been years since I’ve been on a train or working with trains. My last opportunity would have been two summers ago, to ride from Qualicum Beach to Victoria, British Columbia; as the Dad I was saddled with taking family to Victoria in our van. It may be an interesting setting for breaking away from the habits and patterns of Life for a few hours … or a few days. I’ve got five days off soon … it might be something to try.

      Thank you for looking in on the Wisconsin Locomotive Post.

      Take care …

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